Tech News

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2018 Nissan Rogue Hybrid adds standard tech, bumps price - Roadshow

Cnet - Wed, 2018-05-02 08:57
Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and an additional USB port are now standard for all trims.
Categories: Tech News

LG G7 ThinQ specs vs. Galaxy S9, Pixel 2, iPhone 8 Plus - CNET

Cnet - Wed, 2018-05-02 08:49
We've got your head-to-head breakdown here.
Categories: Tech News

Red Dead Redemption 2 gets a dramatic new trailer - CNET

Cnet - Wed, 2018-05-02 08:47
Rockstar Games unveiled a trailer in advance of the game's October release.
Categories: Tech News

Facebook's Free Walled-Garden Internet Program Ended Quietly in Myanmar, Several Other Places Last Year

SlashDot - Wed, 2018-05-02 08:34
An anonymous reader shares a TechCrunch report: As recently as last week, Facebook was touting the growth of Free Basics, its Internet.org project designed to give users free curated web access in developing countries, but the app isn't working out everywhere. As the Outline originally reported and TechCrunch confirmed, the Free Basics program has ended in Myanmar, perhaps Facebook's most controversial non-Western market at the moment. Myanmar is not the only place where Free Basics has quietly ended. The program has been abruptly called off in more than half a dozen nations and territories in the recent months, according to an analysis by The Outline. People in Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, Trinidad and Tobago, Republic of Congo, Anguilla, El Salvador, and Saint Lucia have also lost access to Facebook's free internet program. Additionally, Facebook was testing Free Basics service in Zimbabwe in mid-2016 in partnership with local telecom operator Telecel. The test program has yet to materialize into a wider roll-out.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Tech News

Scientists want to turn your eyes into lasers - CNET

Cnet - Wed, 2018-05-02 08:32
At the University of St Andrews, researchers are building lasers that could fit on a contact lens.
Categories: Tech News

2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat teased with slick new hood - Roadshow

Cnet - Wed, 2018-05-02 08:21
The 2019 update apparently goes beyond mere aesthetics, but the hood's a good place to start.
Categories: Tech News

Snap's sales signal it may not be snapping back anytime soon - CNET

Cnet - Wed, 2018-05-02 08:01
The social network posted big disappointments in sales and losses in its first quarter earnings. A poorly thought out redesign may be to blame.
Categories: Tech News

The MoviePass Unlimited Plan Is Back

Wired - Wed, 2018-05-02 08:00
Two weeks after MoviePass' unlimited plan disappeared, the service is reviving it—and explaining some of its controversial practices.
Categories: Tech News

Nikola Motor takes Tesla to court over design patents - Roadshow

Cnet - Wed, 2018-05-02 07:51
Three specific design cues are at the heart of the allegations.
Categories: Tech News

A Critical Security Flaw in Popular Industrial Software Put Power Plants At Risk

SlashDot - Wed, 2018-05-02 07:49
A severe vulnerability in a widely used industrial control software could have been used to disrupt and shut down power plants and other critical infrastructure. From a report: Researchers at security firm Tenable found the flaw in the popular Schneider Electric software, used across the manufacturing and power industries, which if exploited could have allowed a skilled attacker to attack systems on the network. It's the latest vulnerability that risks an attack to the core of any major plant's operations at a time when these systems have become a greater target in recent years. The report follows a recent warning, issued by the FBI and Homeland Security, from Russian hackers. The affected Schneider software, InduSoft Web Studio and InTouch Machine Edition, acts as middleware between industrial devices and their human operators. It's used to automate the various moving parts of a power plant or manufacturing unit, by keeping tabs on data collection sensors and control systems. But Tenable found that a bug in that central software could leave an entire plant exposed.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Tech News

Google Chrome is Freezing Intermittently With the Windows 10 April 2018 Update, Users Say

SlashDot - Wed, 2018-05-02 07:08
Several users who have updated their computers to Windows 10 April 2018 Update are reporting that Chrome is freezing their machines. From a report: I have now used the April 2018 Update for nearly 24 hours and the same problem has presented itself no less than five times. For a machine - which was working perfectly prior to the update - with a Core i7 CPU, 16GB of RAM, and a 512GB SSD, I naturally resorted to Reddit and Microsoft forum threads to see if others were experiencing the issue. It appears that several users on Reddit (spotted by Softpedia) with machines sporting varying configurations are experiencing the problem as well, and the only fix to it is the one I found too; that is, putting the laptop to sleep using the power button or closing the lid.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Tech News

3 cool new features on the LG G7's camera - CNET

Cnet - Wed, 2018-05-02 07:00
LG's marquee G7 phone has dual 16-megapixel cameras with a few tricks up their sleeves
Categories: Tech News

Some Comcast Customers Won't Get The Latest Broadband Upgrades Without Buying Cable TV

TechDirt - Wed, 2018-05-02 06:22

As we've often noted, Comcast has been shielded from the cord cutting trend somewhat thanks to its growing monopoly over broadband. As users on slow DSL lines flee telcos that are unwilling to upgrade their damn networks, they're increasingly flocking to cable operators for faster speeds. When they get there, they often bundle TV services; not necessarily because they want it, but because it's intentionally cheaper than buying broadband standalone.

And while Comcast's broadband monopoly has protected it from TV cord cutting somewhat, the rise in streaming competition has slowly eroded that advantage, and Comcast is expected to see see double its usual rate of cord cutting this year according to Wall Street analysts.

Comcast being Comcast, the company has a semi-nefarious plan B. Part of that plan is to abuse its monopoly over broadband to deploy arbitrary and unnecessary usage caps and overage fees. These restrictions are glorified rate hikes applied to non competitive markets, with the added advantage of making streaming video more expensive. It's a punishment for choosing to leave Comcast's walled garden.

But Comcast appears to have discovered another handy trick that involves using its broadband monopoly to hamstring cord cutters. Reports emerged this week that the company is upgrading the speeds of customers in Houston and parts of the Pacific Northwest, but only if they continue to subscribe to traditional cable television. The company's press release casually floats over the fact that only Comcast video customers will see these upgrades for now:

"Speed increases will vary based on the Xfinity Internet customers' current speed subscriptions. Those receiving the speed boost will benefit from an increase of 30 to 40 percent in their download speeds. Existing Xfinity Internet and X1 video customers subscribing to certain packages can expect to experience enhanced speeds this month."

As is usually the case, Comcast simply acted as if this was all just routine promotional experimentation (an argument that only works if you're unfamiliar with Comcast's other efforts to constrain emerging video competition):

"We asked Comcast a few questions, including whether it will make speed increases in other cities contingent on TV subscribership. A Comcast spokesperson didn't answer, but noted, "we test and introduce new bundles all the time." The spokesperson also said that the speed increase for Houston is the second in 2018, after one in January. The Oregon/SW Washington speed increase is apparently the first one this year."

In a healthy market with healthy regulatory oversight, either competition or adult regulatory supervision would prevent Comcast from using its broadband monopoly to constrain consumer video choices. But if you hadn't noticed, the telecom and TV sector and the current crop of regulators overseeing it aren't particularly healthy, and with the looming death of net neutrality you're going to see a whole lot more behavior like this designed to erect artificial barriers to genuine consumer choice and competition.



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Categories: Tech News

Facebook F8 Liveblog Day Two: All the News, as It Happens

Wired - Wed, 2018-05-02 06:00
Join us for live coverage of Facebook F8's day two keynote, starting at 9:30am PDT.
Categories: Tech News

The Doomy Gloomy Revival of Old-School First-Person Shooters

Wired - Wed, 2018-05-02 06:00
Two new games are bringing back the narrative strokes of classic shooters—and that's awesome.
Categories: Tech News

Want to Prune Trees More Easily? Use Physics

Wired - Wed, 2018-05-02 06:00
A blade will slice into a limb at some particular minimum pressure—but there are different ways to reach that value.
Categories: Tech News

Facebook Brags That Messenger Has 300,000 Business Bots

SlashDot - Wed, 2018-05-02 06:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Mashable: At F8, Facebook's Vice President of Messaging Products, David Marcus, jovially reported that Messenger's integration with business is going swimmingly. According to Marcus, over 8 billion messages have been sent between people and businesses. And there are 300,000 monthly active bots engaging with customers on messenger. Facebook introduced messenger bots for businesses at F8 in 2016. The idea is that bots allow for automated communication between businesses and customers, helping with issues like product recommendations and customer service. According to Marcus, that 300,000 number grew from just 100,000 monthly active bots in its first year.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Tech News

What Mark Zuckerberg Gets Wrong—and Right—About Hate Speech

Wired - Wed, 2018-05-02 05:00
Opinion: Artificial intelligence can help identify hate speech, but even the best AI can’t replace human beings.
Categories: Tech News

The Tricky Logistics of Delivering a Spacecraft on the Interstate

Wired - Wed, 2018-05-02 05:00
McCollister's hauls a lot of oversized things, from astronaut capsules to weather-monitoring satellites to military aircraft. And it goes fine—usually.
Categories: Tech News

NASA’s InSight Lander Will Probe Mars, Measure Its Quakes

Wired - Wed, 2018-05-02 05:00
Brace yourself, Mars. NASA's sending a 5-meter probe to take your temperature.
Categories: Tech News
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